Interspecific Hybridization between Coreopsis leavenworthii and Coreopsis tinctoria Differently Affected Growth, Development, and Reproduction of Their Progeny

The genus Coreopsis L. is Florida’s state wildflower; there is a strong interest in commercial production and large-scale planting of Coreopsis seed in Florida, especially the seed of Coreopsis leavenworthi Torr. & A. Gray (COLE) and Coreopsis tinctoria Nutt. (COTI). Both species belong to the same section [Calliopsis (Reichenb.) Nutt.] within Coreopsis and were known…

Florida tickseed

Florida tickseed

Florida tickseed (Coreopsis floridana) is one of 12 Coreopsis species native to Florida. It is endemic to the state and occurs naturally in wet pinelands and prairies, cypress swamp edges and roadside ditches. It typically blooms from late summer into early winter, but may bloom year-round. Its bright sunny flowers attract a variety of pollinators, especially butterflies.

Anne MacKay honored with 2019 Coreopsis Award

Anne MacKay honored with 2019 Coreopsis Award

Anne MacKay received the 2019 T. Elizabeth Pate Coreopsis Award during the Florida Wildflower Symposium on April 13 in recognition of her advocacy for Florida’s wildflowers. For 20 years, Anne has steered work for Florida’s wildflowers, first serving on the Florida Wildflower Advisory Council, then on the Florida Wildflower Foundation’s board of directors, on which she served as chair.

Jeff Caster receives 2020 Coreopsis Award

Jeff Caster receives 2020 Coreopsis Award

The Florida Wildflower Foundation selects retiring Florida Department of Transportation Landscape Architect Jeff Caster to receive the 2020 Coreopsis Award for his lifetime of devotion to Florida’s wildflowers.

Welcome Baker’s tickseed

Welcome Baker’s tickseed

by Claudia Larsen Follow this new species' journey from discovery to naming Recently discovered in North Florida's Jackson County, Coreopsis bakeri has gone undetected for years because of its resemblance to our common lanceleaf tickseed (Coreopsis lanceolata). Several years of scientific study finally proved that, indeed, it is has been isolated long enough to have...
Lanceleaf tickseed

Lanceleaf tickseed

Lanceleaf tickseed (Coreopsis lanceolata) has conspicuously sunny flowers that typically bloom in spring. It attracts butterflies and other pollinators, and its seeds are eaten by birds and small wildlife.

Leavenworth’s tickseed

Leavenworth’s tickseed

Leavenworth’s tickseed (Coreopsis leavenworthii) it is often used as a component of mixed wildflower and butterfly gardens, and is excellent for sunny roadsides, highway medians and powerline easements.

Swamp tickseed

Swamp tickseed

Swamp tickseed (Coreopsis nudata) blooms in spring and is attractive to bees, although butterflies and other pollinators are known to visit them. Birds eat its seeds.

Dr. Walter Taylor receives 2018 Coreopsis Award

Dr. Walter Taylor receives 2018 Coreopsis Award

Dr. Walter K. Taylor, University of Central Florida professor emeritus of biology, has received the Florida Wildflower Foundation’s T. Elizabeth Pate Coreopsis Award for his lifetime of contributions to La Florida, “land of flowers.”

Tickseeds – Are you playing matchmaker?

Tickseeds – Are you playing matchmaker?

A concern was recently raised about planting two species of Tickseed (Coreopsis spp.) near each other in a garden because the two might hybridize. If they were both Florida ecotypes, so what if they did? We share what research has shown us about this intriguing issue.