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E-news on Wildflowers

Why native wildflowers?

Wildflowers do much more than give La Florida, the “land of flowers,” its unique sense of place.

Because they’ve adapted to Florida’s conditions and pests, they typically require less water, fertilizer and pesticides than other flowers. They also support myriad native wildlife, from bees to hummingbirds.
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What you can do on our site:

On tour: 500 Years in the Place of Flowers

Our touring photo exhibit, "La Florida: 500 Years in the Place of Flowers," commemorates the natural history and culture of our state, which Juan Ponce de Leon named in 1513. Roughly translated, La Florida means place or land of flowers.

The display includes 15 glorious large-format photos by nature photographer John Moran, perfectly illustrating the timeless beauty of Florida's native wildflowers. See a list of venues and dates through 2014. Click here to become an exhibit sponsor. Learn more about the commemoration of La Florida's 500 years on our Viva Florida page. 

  • Florida native wildflower image
  • Florida native wildflower image
  • Florida native wildflower image
  • Florida native wildflower image
  • Florida native wildflower image
  • Florida native wildflower image
  • Florida native wildflower image
  • Florida native wildflower image
  • Florida native wildflower image
  • Florida native wildflower image
  • Florida native wildflower image
  • Florida native wildflower image
  • Florida native wildflower image
  • Florida native wildflower image
  • Florida native wildflower image

No matter where you want wildflowers, this site has the information you need. Visit our page on Planting and Growing Wildflowers to learn how you can be successful in any setting.

Take a road trip!

Plan a trip in the Land of Flowers by seeing what's in bloom across the state. Our interactive gallery features all seasons and regions. Whether you go by car, bike or foot, our Website is your map and guide to the fabulous wildflowers of Florida

             Send us your pix!

 

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Wet, warm winter brings early spring flowers

Above-normal temperatures predicted for spring, combined with adequate winter rains throughout much of the state, should result in showy displays of early spring beauties such skyblue lupine (Lupinus diffusus), lyreleaf sage (Salvia lyrata), violets (Viola spp.), spiderwort (Tradescantia ohiensis), toadflax (Linaria spp.), and annual phlox (Phlox drummondii). While annual phlox is not native to Florida, it is a familiar roadside wildflower throughout the Big Bend and Central Florida as far south as Tampa.

While this spring should be warmer than normal, it should be relatively dry, so moist sites in rural areas will be best for good wildflower displays in April and May. Look for Leavenworth’s tickseed (Coreopsis leavenworthii), Southeastern sneezeweed (Helenium pinnatifidum), and the blue prairie Iris (Iris hexagona). Another common native species of moist areas in Central and South Florida is black-eyed Susan (Rudbeckia hirta), although in the Panhandle, that species tends to occur in drier habitats. A good place to view showy stands of Leavenworth’s tickseed, black-eyed Susan and other wildflowers that prefer moist sites is the Florida Turnpike south of Orlando, from about mile marker 220 south to Yeehaw Junction.
 
Read more on The Bloom Report.
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FWF releases 2012-13 Annual Report

Thanks to your support, thousands of children are experiencing Florida’s native wildflowers, growing them at school and learning about their connection to the food on our tables.

You’ve also helped fund an effort to ferret out and make available scientific data on wildflowers to researchers, growers, restoration ecologists, citizen scientists and more. And through a traveling photography exhibit, your support is bringing a new awareness of the beauty and vitality of native habitat to Floridians.

Read more about what you helped us accomplish - download the Foundation's 2012-13 Annual Report.

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FDOT adopts new wildflower program

Left to right - FDOT landscape architect Jeff Caster, FDOT wildflower horticulturalist Jeff Norcini, FDOT Sec. Ananth Prasad; Florida Wildflower Foundation liaison Eleanor Dietrich.

TALLAHASSEE - Florida Department of Transportation Secretary Ananth Prasad recently signed the department's new Wildflower Management Program Procedure, which will allow more of the state's native wildflowers to flourish along roadsides through reduced mowing and other management practices.

FDOT state transportation landscape architect Jeff Caster said, “Roadsides are the state’s most visited and visible landscape. The department is committed to increasing the visibility and enjoyment of native wildflowers.”
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The Florida Wildflower Foundation is a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit organization.
Your dollars support planting, research and grant programs that fill our world with wildflowers.