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Operations and Development Coordinator

The Florida Wildflower Foundation is seeking an energetic, creative and self-motivated person to join our team as Communications Coordinator. The position offers the opportunity to participate in a broad range of duties as part of a small, professional, team-oriented conservation organization. The Communications Coordinator will help develop and implement dynamic communications strategies across a variety of platforms.

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Florida Keys blackbead

Florida Keys blackbead is a lovely tropical shrub common to coastal hammocks in Southeast Florida. Its beautiful blooms and wildlife value make it a great addition to the home landscape.

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Coastalplain balm

Coastalplain balm is a striking wildflower found in sandhill and scrub habitats. When in bloom, a single plant may have up to 100 or more bright to pale pink flowers. This creates beautiful fields abuzz with happy bees feasting on nectar and pollinating the plants. Not only is this scene pleasant on the eyes, but the plants also have a wonderful minty aroma that fills the air around them.

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Winged sumac

Winged sumac is a beautiful shrub to small tree found in flatwoods, dry prairie, sandhills, and disturbed sites throughout the eastern US and into Canada that has a wealth of both wildlife and ethnobotanical value.

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Purpledisk honeycombhead

State-endangered Purpledisk honeycombhead occurs in wet pine flatwoods, savannas, bogs and wet ditches and is pollinated by a variety of insects including bumblebees and butterflies. Its known populations are threatened due to habitat loss and fire suppression.

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Pinkscale gayfeather

In fall, Florida’s natural areas and roadsides light up with flares of bright purple from our 17 native Liatris species. Among them, Pinkscale gayfeather (also called Elegant blazing star) is one of the most beautiful and unique. Butterflies and bees are attracted in abundance to its flowers and feed on the nectar they provide.

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Holywood lignumvitae

Holywood lignumvitae is a beautiful and fascinating tropical plant whose range is limited in the U.S. to the southern tip of Florida. It is a larval host for the Lyside sulphur butterfly and provides a nectar source for bees and other butterfly species. The seeds also attract and provide food for birds.

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Water cowbane

In late summer and early fall, shallow freshwater wetlands across Florida burst to life with tall stands of Water cowbane. It is a larval host for the Eastern black swallowtail butterfly and the flowers attract a wide variety of pollinators.

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White fringed orchid

White fringed orchid is a striking wildflower found in bogs and wet meadows across North and Central Florida. The summer blooms attract many pollinators from bees to butterflies and moths.

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Oneflower honeycombhead

Oneflower honeycombhead is endemic to the SE US coastal plain region and found in wet pine savannahs and flatwoods. Its beautiful yellow flowers attract butterflies and bees and the seedheads provide food for birds

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Savannah meadowbeauty

Of Florida’s 10 native meadowbeauties (Rhexia genus), the Savannah meadowbeauty (Rhexia alifanus) stands among the tallest at around 4 feet. Its bright pink blooms can be seen rising up like flags from the shorter vegetation of the pine flatwoods, wet savannahs and roadside ditches. It is pollinated by bees through a unique strategy called buzz pollination!

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Climbing hempvine

Climbing hempvine is a lovely herbaceous vine that can be found rambling among low-growing vegetation along the edges of wet forests, prairies and marshes. It packs some powerful wildlife value as a larval host for the Little metalmark butterfly, nectar source for a diversity of pollinators, and nutritious forage for herbivorous mammals.

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Fall Garden Tour and Workshop at Blountstown Pollinator Demonstration Garden

Join the Florida Wildflower Foundation for a tour of the Blountstown pollinator demonstration garden on Saturday, Sept. 17 from 9am-12pm or Sunday, Sept. 18 from 1pm-4pm. This casual workshop is designed to provide inspiration and demonstrate basic protocols for installation and maintenance of similar efforts.

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Leafless swallowwort

Leafless swallowwort is a strange little flowering vine that occurs along the edges of upland to coastal hammocks and floodplain to pineland forests. It is the sole larval host for the Giant milkweed bug (Sephina gundlachi).

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Crested fringed orchid

Crested fringed orchid (Platanthera cristata) is a state-threatened terrestrial orchid found in wet prairies, seepage bogs, ditches and wet pine flatwoods. Its bright yellow to light orange flowers bloom in summer, peaking in August

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Nightflowering wild petunia

As the name suggests, Nightflowering wild petunia (Ruellia noctiflora) is a night-blooming wildflower whose flowers open around dusk then shrivel and drop by mid-morning the next day. The bloom’s nectaries are located at the base of a 3″ long flower tube requiring a special pollinator whose tongue is long enough to reach in and take a sip! The pollinators that fit this bill are sphinx moths (family Sphingidae). These nocturnal moths are attracted by the petunia’s large white flowers.

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Sea oats

There is nothing more iconic to the Florida summer coastal scene than Sea oats (Uniola paniculata) swaying to the sea breeze in the dunes. The flowers of this tall and sprawling grass provide pollen to a variety of insects, and the seeds are eaten by beach mice, rabbits and birds.

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Lakeside Sunflower

Lakeside sunflower (Helianthus carnosus) is a perennial wildflower endemic to northeast Florida that inhabits open sunny edges of lakes and marshes. The beautiful bright yellow flowers attract a variety of bees, butterflies and beetles, and the seeds are eaten by birds.

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Pineland leatherroot

Pineland leatherroot (Orbexilum virgatum) is an exceptionally rare and beautiful perennial wildflower that inhabits dry to moist areas of pine savannahs. Its bright purple flowers bloom from late spring into midsummer.

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Field trip: Marie Selby Botanical Gardens

Join Marie Selby Botanical Gardens guides on Sunday, August 14th at 9:30am in an exclusive members-only field trip to explore different native landscapes and habitats nestled within a tropical oasis. We will tour three areas of native flora, two of them renovated through a Florida Wildflower Foundation grant.

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Yellow milkwort

Yellow milkroot (Polygala rugelii) is an herbaceous wildflower endemic to the Florida peninsula. Its showy flowers bloom primarily in summer and fall, but may appear throughout the year.

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Fewflower milkweed

Fewflower milkweed (Asclepias lanceolata) is a delicate wildflower found in swamps and moist to wet pinelands and prairies throughout Florida. Its stunning orange flowers typically bloom late spring through fall.

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Carolina redroot

Carolina redroot (Lachnanthes caroliana) is a perennial herbaceous wildflower that blooms from summer into fall, attracting a variety of butterflies and moths.

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Buttonbush

Buttonbush (Cephalanthus occidentalis) is a wetland shrub with pincushion-like blooms that attract bees, butterflies and moths. Ducks and other birds eat the seeds and the foliage is browsed by deer.

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