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Yellow passionflower

Occurring naturally in woodlands, thickets and maritime forests, Yellow passionflower (Passiflora lutea) is a beautiful, if unassuming, native vine. It blooms in summer, setting fruit in fall and is wonderful for an array of wildlife.

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Meet board member Marissa Kaprow

Marissa Kaprow joined the Florida Wildflower Foundation board in 2014 and has served as Treasurer since 2016. She is a CPA and Director of Audit and Assurance Services at Saltmarsh, Cleaveland & Gund.

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Bring on the Butterflies!

Butterflies are perhaps the most universally loved insect — their beauty and grace captivates us and their presence brings us joy. Ecologically, butterflies are also incredibly important! Learn how your gardening practices can bring on and support a wide diversity of butterflies.

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Whitemouth dayflower

Whitemouth dayflower (Commelina erecta ) is found in pinelands, coastal uplands and scrub habitats. Its blooms attract a variety of pollinators, especially bees. Seeds are eaten by birds, and the foliage is sometimes consumed by gopher tortoises.

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Darrow’s blueberry plant.

Darrow’s blueberry

Darrow’s blueberry (Vaccinium darrowii) is a small shrub that is underappreciated as a landscape plant. Its profuse spring blooms attract many pollinators and the sweet summer berries are attractive to wildlife and edible for us too!

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A planting of Tropical salvia in full bloom.

When seeing red is a good thing!

Our Summer Bloom Report from Jeff Norcini, PhD will have you seeing red in the most beautiful way! Vibrant red native wildflowers brighten the landscape, and those with tubular flowers will attract hummingbirds (and butterflies, too).

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Spiderwort flowers.

Spiderwort

Spiderwort (Tradescantia ohiensis ) flowers attract many pollinators, especially bees. Like all species in the dayflower family, the flowers are ephemeral, meaning they stay open only one day.

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String lily

String lily

String lily (Crinum americanum) is an erect, emergent perennial with showy, fragrant blooms. It occurs naturally in wet hammocks, marshes, swamps, wetland edges, and along streams and rivers.

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Jamaican caper

Jamaican caper (Quadrella jamaicensis) is an excellent accent plant for both formal and naturalistic landscapes in Central to South Florida. It provides year-round interest with its dark shimmery foliage, beautiful spring blooms, and striking open seed pods.

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Clasping milkweed

Clasping milkweed (Asclepias amplexicaulis) is a late spring- through summer- blooming milkweed that occurs in dry sandy areas from sandhills to pine savannahs, open woodlands and fallow fields.

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Spanish bayonet

Spanish bayonet (Yucca aloifolia) flowers spring through fall and provides food and cover for a variety of wildlife. The blooms are frequented for their nectar by hummingbirds and butterflies.

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Coralbean

Coralbean (Erythrina herbacea ) is a deciduous to evergreen woody shrub. It produces red tubular flowers that attract hummingbirds and butterflies.

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Meet board member Kody Smith

Kody joined the Florida Wildflower Foundation board in September 2021. He is the CEO and senior principal landscape architect at Dix.Hite + Partners.

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Slimleaf pawpaw

Slimleaf pawpaw (Asimina angustifolia) is a deciduous flowering shrub found in flatwoods, scrub and sandhills from southeast Georgia into North Florida. It is a larval host for the Zebra swallowtail butterfly and Pawpaw sphinx moth.

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Woolly pawpaw

Woolly pawpaw (Asimina incana ) is a deciduous flowering shrub found in pine flatwoods, scrubby oak ridges, open fields and pastures from southeastern Georgia into North and Central Florida. Other common names include Flag pawpaw and Polecat bush.

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Smallflower pawpaw

Smallflower pawpaw (Asimina parviflora ) is a deciduous flowering shrub to small tree found in floodplain forests and hardwood hammocks throughout the Southeastern Coastal Plain from southern Virginia to eastern Texas.

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Sweet pinxter azalea

Sweet pinxter azalea (Rhododendron canescens) has showy pinkish- to rose-colored flowers that bloom in spring. They attract a number of pollinators, including hummingbirds.

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Frogfruit flowers

Frogfruit

Frogfruit (Phyla nodiflora) is both a versatile and vital wildflower. This evergreen perennial is low-growing and creeping, often forming dense mats of green foliage.

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Florida’s spring-flowering tickseeds

In the spring, many Florida roadsides and natural areas are painted yellow with showy Coreopsis, commonly known as tickseed. Florida’s state wildflower, five of our 12 native species bloom in spring.

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Spring “weeds” are for the bees!

While much of the country awaits No Mow May to leave the early spring wildflowers in urban areas for hungry pollinators, Florida more appropriately observes No Mow March! So before you get to work mowing or weeding, let’s look at some of the most common lawn “weeds” and learn a little more about them!

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Lady lupine

Lady lupine (Lupinus villosus) is a stunning spring bloomer endemic to the Southeastern Coastal Plain. It thrives in the deep, well-drained sandy soils of sandhill habitats.

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Microscope image provided by Geo Debs

WEBINAR — The Soil Food Web

In this webinar, Geo Debs takes us on an introductory journey through the world beneath our feet, the Soil Food Web.

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Invasive Plants in Florida

Florida is uniquely varied in its climate and growing conditions, allowing a huge variety of plants to thrive. But some of the plants common to our home landscapes are invasive species, many of which are now widespread in Florida’s natural areas.

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Bearded grasspink

Bearded grasspinks (Calopogon barbatus) are the earliest bloomers of Florida’s four Calopogon species, generally starting in January and February. They occur in bogs, wet flatwoods, prairies and roadsides.

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