Summer news from PWA counties

Summer news from PWA counties

The Panhandle Wildflower Alliance’s Fall 2019 newsletter features updates about new wildflower programs, where to see wildflowers in bloom, and much more.

Meet Our Members

Get Involved Support Wildflowers Our members have raised more than $4 million to spread flowers along roadsides, research their mysteries, and teach people how Florida’s first flowers sustain bees and butterflies. Join them today in supporting native wildflowers and the wildlife depending on them. Or print an application to send via mail.

Award-winning roadside wildflowers

Award-winning roadside wildflowers

In a first for Florida, a project to manage naturally occurring wildflowers – versus displays that have been planted – has been recognized for its success. The Florida Federation of Garden Clubs recently gave a “Paths of Sunshine” award to Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) District 5 for successfully protecting and nurturing a natural wildflower display along a stretch of State Road 520 in east Orange County.

Bloom Report: Fall is Aster Time!

Bloom Report: Fall is Aster Time!

Pictured above: Elliott’s aster (Symphyotrichum elliottii). Photo by Ron & Diane Bynum Northern neighbors have their leaves, but we have a rainbow of wildflowersby Jeff Norcini In cooler climates, fall is when “leaf peepers” hit the road to view red-, yellow- and orange-leaved trees. Here in Florida, fall color means wildflowers. And when you hit…

Support

Support Help save wild Florida Support the natural world Get the State Wildflower license plate Our work for native, natural Florida and its creatures, including the bees that feed us, depends on the generosity of our members, donors, volunteers and sponsors, and those who purchase the State Wildflower license plate. Each time a plate is…

Add a hand lens to your field backpack

Add a hand lens to your field backpack

If you have ever walked a trail with a botanist to discover and name each flower you pass, you realize the importance of plant morphology in the taxonomic routine of plant identification. Not only do the “small parts” of each flower and leaf provide clues to each plant’s identity and separate members of the same genus and family, they also show the evolutionary trends that forced that species to specially adapt for survival.

Explore

Explore Want to know what’s blooming in your neck of the woods? We’ve got you covered with our seasonal bloom reports, wildflower driving routes and hotspots, and interactive “What’s Blooming” map. bloom report Summer is milkweed season! Of the 22 milkweed species that occur in Florida, all but one are native. Our native milkweeds bloom…

Board member profile: Anne MacKay

Board member profile: Anne MacKay

Instrumental in getting the Florida Wildflower Foundation off the ground, Anne Mackay continues to serve on the Foundation’s board, first serving on the Florida Wildflower Council board, then as board chair for the Florida Wildflower Foundation. Read why she stays involved.

When spring arrives too soon

When spring arrives too soon

To everything there is a season, but what if those seasons aren’t quite as predictable as they once were? Anecdotal and scientific information increasingly show changes in when plants are blooming, fruiting and going to seed. And that can spell trouble.

Learn to Grow

Learn to Grow

Learn to Grow Get started growing wildflowers Bring best practices home. Discover the best methods for establishing wildflowers in your garden with resources that will help you select and find the right plant for the right place. What is native? A Florida native wildflower is a flowering herbaceous species that grew wild within the state’s…

Heartwood Preserve

Heartwood Preserve

Heartwood Preserve is the first conservation cemetery within a nature preserve in the Tampa Bay area. Join us on this unique opportunity to learn about the efforts to conserve and permanently protect this endangered natural habitat through environmentally friendly burial options. Visit longleaf pine flatwoods and cypress wetlands. Learn the land’s history and management, the importance of fire ecology and the process of conservation burial. 

Gulf fritillary

Gulf fritillary

The Gulf fritillary is sometimes known as the Passion butterfly — so named because of its ardor for Passionflower. You will find so much to love about this unique pollinator!

Gulf fritillaries are medium-sized butterflies with elongated forewings that live in the extreme southern United States. Outside of the U.S., they are a broad-ranging species, found throughout Mexico, Central America, the Caribbean and into South America.Gulf fritillaries enjoy a variety of habitat including sunny roadsides, disturbed areas, edges, fields, pastures, woodlands, second-growth semitropical forests and urban areas like parks and yards. You may even find them blithely floating around your butterfly garden.