Ethnobotany of Wildflowers

Ethnobotany of Wildflowers

Imagine yourself as a native Indian or early explorer 500 hundred years ago trying to survive in Florida. The better part of your day was probably spent hunting or gathering for daily sustenance, making tools and building shelters. Although artifacts are recovered by archeologists, the list of plants used for food, medicine and spiritual purposes was generally passed down by word of mouth through generations of early Floridians. There is quite a compendium of knowledge about early uses of native trees and shrubs, but what about wildflowers?

Dry Landscapes

Dry Landscapes

Wondering what native wildflowers and plants to use in a dry landscape? Use our new handout to evaluate your landscape’s soil moisture and choose diverse species that will thrive and give your landscape a “real Florida” feel.

When spring arrives too soon

When spring arrives too soon

To everything there is a season, but what if those seasons aren’t quite as predictable as they once were? Anecdotal and scientific information increasingly show changes in when plants are blooming, fruiting and going to seed. And that can spell trouble.

Board member profile: Anne MacKay

Board member profile: Anne MacKay

Instrumental in getting the Florida Wildflower Foundation off the ground, Anne Mackay continues to serve on the Foundation’s board, first serving on the Florida Wildflower Council board, then as board chair for the Florida Wildflower Foundation. Read why she stays involved.

20 Easy-to-Grow Wildflowers

20 Easy-to-Grow Wildflowers

This 24-page magazine features 20 “tried and true” wildflowers that are easy to grow and maintain in home and urban landscapes.

Heartwood Preserve

Heartwood Preserve

Heartwood Preserve is the first conservation cemetery within a nature preserve in the Tampa Bay area. Join us on this unique opportunity to learn about the efforts to conserve and permanently protect this endangered natural habitat through environmentally friendly burial options. Visit longleaf pine flatwoods and cypress wetlands. Learn the land’s history and management, the importance of fire ecology and the process of conservation burial. 

Gulf fritillary

Gulf fritillary

The Gulf fritillary is sometimes known as the Passion butterfly — so named because of its ardor for Passionflower. You will find so much to love about this unique pollinator!

Gulf fritillaries are medium-sized butterflies with elongated forewings that live in the extreme southern United States. Outside of the U.S., they are a broad-ranging species, found throughout Mexico, Central America, the Caribbean and into South America.Gulf fritillaries enjoy a variety of habitat including sunny roadsides, disturbed areas, edges, fields, pastures, woodlands, second-growth semitropical forests and urban areas like parks and yards. You may even find them blithely floating around your butterfly garden.

 

Carpenter bees

Carpenter bees

Many Floridians become familiar with carpenter bees by accident. They may notice a hole that appears to have been drilled into unpainted wood around their homes with a sawdust pile beneath it. Or they might hear a buzzing sound coming from within the hole. Both are telltale signs of carpenter bees.

Bumble bees

Bumble bees

Bumble bees are very efficient pollinators because they “buzz pollinate.” The bee grabs onto a flower and vibrates its flight muscles but not its wings. This causes the flower to release its pollen. It also creates an audible buzz at the frequency of a middle C note. The genus name Bombus comes from the Greek bombos, which means “buzzing sound.”

Summer news from PWA counties

Summer news from PWA counties

It is a busy summer and good news abounds for wildflower conservation in Florida’s Panhandle area. The Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) has successfully planted a large wildflower meadow along Interstate 10 near the Sneads exit, the City of Sopchoppy was awarded a Florida Wildflower Foundation (FWF) Viva Florida landscape grant for the Depot Park...