Education

Education Our publications, events and projects give people the tools and knowledge they need to build and enjoy urban and roadside native wildflower corridors. Publications Download or view handouts and brochures that will guide you in building your habitat. Click here to order copies for an event or meeting. Webinars Field trips Request a speaker…

Create a Pollinator Pot

Create a Pollinator Pot

The insects that pollinate our food crops and natural areas are in steep decline. Our suburban landscapes are more important than ever in supporting them. No place for a garden? No problem! Our new video and handout can help you create a small pollinator oasis in a pot!

Bloom Report: Summer wildflower viewing

Bloom Report: Summer wildflower viewing

Spring and fall wildflowers can be spectacular with a plethora of yellow and purple flowers, but summer seems to offer a wider diversity of colorful, showy wildflowers along roadsides.

Member profile: Peter and Kim Connolly

Member profile: Peter and Kim Connolly

Kim and Peter Connolly have been active members of the Florida Wildflower Foundation and have attended various Foundation field trips and events for the past three years.They are both Florida Master Naturalists, with Peter serving his third year on the board of the Space Coast Chapter. Their free time is spent documenting local flora and fauna for iNaturalist. To date, they have added 907 observations of unique species to the site.

Gulf fritillary

Gulf fritillary

The Gulf fritillary is sometimes known as the Passion butterfly — so named because of its ardor for Passionflower. You will find so much to love about this unique pollinator!

Gulf fritillaries are medium-sized butterflies with elongated forewings that live in the extreme southern United States. Outside of the U.S., they are a broad-ranging species, found throughout Mexico, Central America, the Caribbean and into South America.Gulf fritillaries enjoy a variety of habitat including sunny roadsides, disturbed areas, edges, fields, pastures, woodlands, second-growth semitropical forests and urban areas like parks and yards. You may even find them blithely floating around your butterfly garden.

 

Great wildflowers for your dry landscape

Great wildflowers for your dry landscape

If you have added wildflowers to your landscape, you’ve probably learned how adaptable they are to a wide range of environmental conditions. Although it is a challenge to introduce wildflowers to a dry site, many species will adapt and flourish once established.

Monarchs and milkweed: What you need to know

Monarchs and milkweed: What you need to know

The Monarch butterfly’s demise has captured America’s attention. You can help by using native milkweed species in your landscape. Find out what you need to know to help save Monarchs.

Queen butterfly

Queen butterfly

In the same genus as Monarchs, Queen butterflies share many characteristics with their royal cousins. Queens and Monarchs are similar in appearance, rely on milkweed as a host plant and carry a toxin from milkweed in their bodies into adulthood. Queens do not participate in the same migration as Monarchs, however, and have distinguishing physical differences.

 

 

Attracting Butterflies

Attracting Butterflies

You can help provide food and habitat for Florida’s butterflies by landscaping with native wildflowers. Learn more now.

Delaware skipper

Delaware skipper

Originally named for the Delaware tribes of Native Americans near where this butterfly was discovered, the Delaware skipper is now found throughout the eastern United States. This small, bright orange butterfly is attracted to grassy meadows and wet areas. As part of the Grass skipper subfamily of skippers, its larval hosts are grasses and sedges.

 

 

Attracting Bees

Attracting Bees

You can help provide food and habitat for Florida’s native bees and other beneficial insects by landscaping with native wildflowers.