20 Easy-to-Grow Wildflowers — your guide to success!

20 Easy-to-Grow Wildflowers — your guide to success!

With interest mounting in using wildflowers in urban landscapes, there is a huge demand for information for those new to Florida’s native plants. Enter “20 Easy-to-Grow Wildflowers,” a new publication from the Florida Wildflower Foundation. The free 24-page magazine features a selection of 20 “tried and true” species that are easy to grow and maintain.

It’s not a garden, it’s a habitat

It’s not a garden, it’s a habitat

Ecologists estimate that only 3 to 4 percent of land in the United States has been undisturbed by human activity. That’s why providing habitat — food, shelter and nesting areas for wildlife — within sustainable urban landscapes should be an important goal for everyone.

We can’t create a perfect natural habitat for each species. However, we can make a difference by using Florida’s native wildflowers and plants. Learn how!

FWF receives grant for “20 Easy Wildflowers”

FWF receives grant for “20 Easy Wildflowers”

The Florida Wildflower Foundation  has received a $17,000 grant from Stanley Smith Horticultural Trust for its project, “20 Easy Wildflowers to Grow Now!” It includes a publication, continuing education courses for horticultural professionals, and live social media events.

Layering is key in Orange County meadow design

Layering is key in Orange County meadow design

Central Florida gardeners will soon a have a new location to see and explore Florida’s native wildflowers and grasses. A no-mow wildflower meadow is being installed at the Orange County UF/IFAS Extension’s Exploration Gardens in Orlando, funded by the Florida Wildflower Foundation’s Viva Florida Landscape Demonstration Garden grant. The meadow will be approximately 2,700 square feet and will include 25 species of Florida native wildflowers and grasses. Eventually, it will connect two sections of a planned native tree walk.

Cape Coral garden showcases waves of native color

Cape Coral garden showcases waves of native color

A visit to Cape Coral’s Rotary Park Environmental Center includes a new opportunity to become acquainted with some of Florida’s beautiful native wildflowers. With funds from the Florida Wildflower Foundation’s Viva Florida Landscape Demonstration Garden grant program, a native wildflower garden has been planted near the park’s education center.

Spring — a time of renewal, planting and planning

Spring in the wildflower garden — a time of renewal, planting and planning by Claudia Larsen “Like a great poet, Nature knows how to produce the greatest effects with the most limited means.” — Heinrich Hein, German poet (1797-1856) Who doesn’t love spring? It puts us in a happy place to see plants bursting forth with new green...
Make your wildflower garden wild, not weedy

Make your wildflower garden wild, not weedy

Wildflower gardens add a natural look to otherwise ordered landscapes. But that natural appearance will become weedy if weeds are not controlled. Unlike the infomercial tagline, “set it and forget it,” doing so in any garden, let alone a Florida wildflower garden, often results in a weedy mess. Weeds that commonly occur in wildflower gardens vary widely across the state. Here are simple suggestions for controlling any weed occurring in a wildflower garden.

Member profile: Chris Waltz

Member profile: Chris Waltz

There’s a good chance that if you’ve been to any Florida Wildflower Foundation events, you may have run into this member. Most recently, he could be found with 25 other wildflower enthusiasts at the Tosohatchee Wildlife Management Area, soaking up some plant identification and lore on a walk led by author and FWF board member Dr. Walter K. Taylor.

FWF member Chris Waltz is known to many in native plant circles because of the supporting role he plays in conferences and other events. Here is what Chris has to say about his involvement with the Florida Wildflower Foundation.

White peacock

White peacock

White peacock butterflies fly in Florida throughout the year. They are small white butterflies with brown markings and orange margins. The common name comes from black spots on the forewings and hindwings, giving the appearance of a peacock’s eyespot.

Bloom report: Blazing star lives up to its name

Bloom report: Blazing star lives up to its name

Late summer rains across most of Florida were enough to promote showy displays of native wildflowers and grasses this fall.  Above-normal temperatures and normal rain are forecast for fall, which may result in earlier flowering of some native wildflowers and grasses.